Cinnamon Toast and Other Things

Cinnamon Sticks and Ground CinnamonThis morning I just felt like something different for breakfast. I am not a big breakfast eater at the best of times because I just don’t feel like eating that early in the morning.  I generally have to force myself to eat something but it is usually around 10am or so that I finally get around to making something to eat.

Funnily enough, when I am on holidays and living out of a hotel, I have no problem rushing down to the buffet breakfast and eating as much as I can. Maybe it’s because someone else is preparing it for me or because the food is so much more interesting. Or maybe it’s because I have walked for miles the day before and my body is craving some food to keep the energy levels up. Who knows? What I do know though is that I just enjoy good hotel buffet breakfasts.

But let’s not get me started on travel. This is one of the things that I really love to do. And my best friend and business partner, Wanda, who works on this website with me, loves to do the same. So any excuse and we are off! But now I am getting sidetracked…

So anyway, back to today’s breakfast.

Lately I have been scouring the net looking for good cooking blogs to add to our Blog of the Week section and found a site with a nice Cinnamon Toast recipe. I love cinnamon so this really appealed to me. I have had it saved in my favorites for a while now but never got around to making it. So today was the day.

It took about a minute to put together the ingredients and another minute or two for it to toast and there I was with a nice simple and really tasty breakfast.

Now I will probably get bored with this pretty quickly if I have it every day. Not because of the recipe but because that is what I am generally like with food. I like variety and I am not one for having the same thing day after day. But I will keep this one for those occasions when I am wanting something sweet for breakfast.

How to Season Your Carbon Steel Wok

carbon-steel-wokIf you love oriental food and would love to create it at home, you may have considered buying a wok. Having your own wok makes it much easier to cook authentic tasting Chinese or oriental food.

Woks come in a variety of materials including stainless steel, electric, non-stick and aluminum. Carbon steel woks are very popular with chefs as they relatively inexpensive, easy to clean and conduct heat well.

If you have purchased a carbon steel wok then you will need to ensure it is seasoned for best results.

Read our latest article on how to season your carbon steel wok.

How Should I Care For My Dutch Oven?

orange-dutch-oven
The first thing you need to do is to check if your Dutch Oven needs seasoning. If it does, heat the pot until it is hot but still touchable. Coat the inside and outside of both pot and lid with cooking oil and leave it to cool completely.

Some Dutch ovens are now manufactured in such a way that they don’t need seasoning.

How you need to clean your your Dutch Oven depends on what it is made from. If it is cast iron, then you firstly need to remove any stuck on food by boiling warm, clean water in the Dutch oven. Don’t use any soap as this will strip off the seasoning and may impart its scent to your next Dutch oven meal. Gently scrape off any food and rinse the pot in clean, warm water. Leave it to air dry and then re-season before storing.

• Don’t ever allow the pot to sit in water or let water stand it – it will rust!
• Don’t ever put an empty cast iron pot over a fire. It will crack or warp.
• Don’t ever put cold liquid into a cast iron Dutch oven that is very hot – it will crack immediately!

Read more about Dutch ovens

Here are some excellent buys in Dutch Ovens:



Calphalon Contemporary Stainless Steel Launch – Sept 07

cs-nonstick-small.JPGIntroducing Calphalon® CS Nonstick Cookware
Bring High Style into Real Kitchens—Yours!

TOLEDO, OH, July 27, 2007— This fall, Calphalon® will introduce a new line of nonstick cookware that’s 100% dishwasher safe. Ideal for cooks who love the lustrous, contemporary beauty of brushed stainless steel but consider no-fuss nonstick cooking and cleaning a must-have, Calphalon CS Nonstick offers both convenience and style, pairing exceptional nonstick performance with the striking good looks of Calphalon’s best-selling Calphalon Contemporary Stainless cookware.

Imagine yourself executing a flawless frittata. Picture your fettuccine alfredo sliding effortlessly from your sauce pan, leaving not a trace of cheesy sauce behind. Calphalon CS Nonstick is ideal for cooking and serving even sticky or delicate dishes like these with exquisite style. The cookware’s clean lines, curvy silhouettes and beautifully sculpted handles are a design enthusiast’s dream, while its dishwasher safe nonstick cooking surface is sure to satisfy even the most practical cooks.

Calphalon CS Nonstick features tri-ply construction for superb heat conductivity. Two layers of 18/10 stainless steel surround a heavy gauge aluminum core. Calphalon’s legendary nonstick coating guarantees exceptional release and durability. The pans are guaranteed to last a lifetime, even if you run them through the dishwasher every day. Long handles stay comfortably cool on the stovetop and the covers are made from a tempered glass, so you can peer right into the pots. Calphalon CS Nonstick is oven safe to 450 degrees.

Calphalon CS Nonstick will be available exclusively at Bloomingdale’s in September 2007. It will roll out to fine stores nationwide later in the fall.

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About Calphalon

Based in Toledo, Ohio, Calphalon (www.calphalon.com) is a leading manufacturer of professional quality cookware, cutlery, bakeware, and kitchen accessories for the home chef. Calphalon is a Newell Rubbermaid company.

Why are Dutch ovens called ‘Dutch’?

why-are-dutch-ovens-called-dutch1No-one is quite sure but there are various theories.

  • In 1704, an Englishman called Abraham Darby, travelled to Holland to see a Dutch casting process. On his return home, Darby refined the method and began casting pots. He shipped them to the new colonies in America and all over the world. The name may have originated from the Dutch casting process.
  • Early Dutch traders and salesmen peddled cast iron pots hence the name.
  • Dutch settlers in the region of Pennsylvania used cast iron pots or kettles.