Weston Products Launches Website for Michael Symon’s New Product Line

michael-symon-live-to-cookCLEVELAND, Ohio (December 1, 2011) – Kitchenware manufacturer Weston Products has launched a new site, MichaelSymon.WestonProducts.com, as an online source for its latest line of specialty kitchen products, the Michael Symon Live to Cook collection.

Celebrity Chef Michael Symon is an Iron Chef, Food Network Star, host of ABC’s “The Chew,” and now, he has launched his first kitchenware line. The Michael Symon Live to Cook Collection by Weston includes a meat grinder, vacuum sealer, sausage stuffer, French fry cutter, burger presses, and several other stainless steel kitchen tools “for those who take cooking seriously.”
In addition to viewing product details and purchasing the items on the site, consumers can watch product demos hosted by the Iron Chef himself. The site also gives customers the opportunity to preview recipes from Weston’s Michael Symon “For Those Who Take Cooking Seriously” Recipe Collection, which is included free with each product in the line.

“We couldn’t be more excited about our partnership with Chef Symon,” said Michael Caspar, CEO of Weston Products. “Being from Cleveland made the partnership a perfect fit – our shared values on food preparation made it a no-brainer.”

Symon, currently the owner of four critically acclaimed restaurants and eight total locations, chose to partner with Weston Products to make restaurant-style cooking more approachable to the home cook. The self-proclaimed “meat-centric” chef selected products for crafting foods like burgers, sausages, and French fries from fresh ingredients.

“Weston products have changed the way I cook.” said Symon. “They make cooking easier, more efficient, and always fun.” In addition to MichaelSymon.WestonProducts.com, the Michael Symon Live to Cook collection is set to be available at fine retailers across the country in the next coming months.

live-to-cook-michael-symonAbout Michael Symon

Chef Michael Symon cooks with soul. Growing up in a Greek and Sicilian family, the Cleveland native creates boldly-flavored, deeply satisfying dishes at his four restaurants in America’s heartland: Lola, Lolita, Roast and B Spot. He also shares his exuberant, approachable cooking style and infectious laugh with viewers as an Iron Chef on the Food Network. Since being named a Best New Chef by Food & Wine magazine in 1998, Michael and his restaurants have been awarded numerous honors including Bon Appétit magazine’s Top 10 Best New Burger Joints; SoBe Wine & Food Festival’s People’s Choice award, The James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef and Gourmet magazine’s list of America’s Best Restaurants. Michael can be seen on Food Network’s Iron Chef and The Next Iron Chef, ABC’s The Chew and The Cooking Channel’s Cook Like an Iron Chef.

Live2Cook-Weston®- LogoAbout Weston Products

Founded in 1997, Weston Products is a leading manufacturer of specialty food processing equipment, specializing in commercial-grade meat processing equipment, home harvesting tools, and traditional style kitchenware. The company is an independently operated private company, owned by current management team Michael Caspar and Jason Berry. Weston Products was listed on the 2011 Inc. 5000, a list of the country’s fastest growing privately held companies.

More information on Weston Products can be found at http://www.westonproducts.com.

From Asparagus to Zucchini: Vegetable Canning for Beginners

Bell-peppersWelcome to the world of canning vegetables! Preserving vegetables yourself gives you the freedom to adjust cooking methods, ingredients, and flavor to taste—as well as to guarantee a stash of your seasonal favorites throughout the year, impress friends and family, and even save some cash in the process. Let’s start by looking at some of the vegetable canning basics.

Pressure Canning Vegetables

All vegetables except tomatoes, sauerkraut, and pickles are low enough in acid that they must always be processed in a pressure canner. Other methods are simply not safe. Because it takes only one spoonful from one jar of poisoned food to cause serious illness or death, the canner may be the most important investment you make.

All canners work according to the same principle. The pan has a tight sealing lid with a regulator. When a small amount of water (usually 1 to 3 inches) is heated in the canner, it is converted to steam, which builds up pressure and reaches temperatures substantially higher than boiling. At 10 to 15 pounds of pressure, the temperature is 240° to 250° F. Safety features maintain pressure at reasonable levels and auto-release if the pressure becomes too high.

There are two types of pressure canners—those with a dial gauge that shows the pressure, and those with a weight control that makes a noise when it reaches the required pressure. Before using any pressure canner, check to ensure that parts are in good working order and read the manufacturer’s directions, including recommended temperatures for your altitude.

Our preference for pressure canners is the All American Pressure Canner, we have found it to be the best for performance.

Step By Step

1.  After packing Mason Jars and fitting them with lids and screwbands, put the rack in the canner and add 2 to 3 inches of water.  Then place jars on the rack.  If you like, you may fill the rack before placing it in the canner.  Put the lid on the canner and fasten it securely.

2.  Open the petcock or remove the weight.  Heat on high until steam flows out.

3.  Continue to heat on high for 10 minutes before closing the petcock or placing the weight on the vent port.  During the next 3 to 5 minutes, the pressure will build.

4.  When the dial gauge shows the recommended amount of pressure, or when the petcock begins jiggling or rocking, set the timer for the time specified in your recipe.  At high altitudes, increase the pressure ½ pound for each 1,000 feet above sea level.

5.  Maintain a temperature at or just above the specified gauge pressure.  Weighted gauges will jiggle 2 or 3 times per minute or rock slowly, depending on the brand.  Avoid large variations in temperature, which may cause liquid to be forced from jars, jeopardizing the seal.

6.  When the time is up, turn off the heat, remove canner from burner if possible, and let it depressurize.  Do not use cold water to speed depressurization and avoid opening the vent port.  Let the canner sit 30 minutes if loaded with pints, or 45 minutes with quarts.  Some models cool more quickly and have vent locks that indicate when pressure is normal.

7.  When pressure has returned to normal, remove the weight or open the petcock.  Let canner sit for two minutes before unfastening and removing the lid.  Keep your face away from the canner to avoid escaping steam.

8.  Using a jar lifter, remove the jars and place them on a folded towel, allowing at least 1 inch of air to circulate between them. Let cool, then store in a cool, dry, dark place.


Timetable for Pressure Canning Vegetables

Vegetable

Method

Inches of Headroom

Minutes to Precook

Minutes to Process a Pint

Minutes to Process a Quart

Asparagus

Raw pack

½

30

40

Beans, fresh lima

Hot pack

1

Bring to a boil

40

50

Beans, snap

Raw pack

½

20

25

Beets

Hot pack

½

15

30

35

Broccoli

Hot pack

1

3

30

35

Brussels sprouts

Hot pack

1

3

30

35

Cabbage

Hot pack

1

3

45

55

Carrots

Raw pack

1

25

30

Cauliflower

Hot pack

1

3

30

35

Celery

Hot pack

1

3

30

35

Cream style corn

Hot pack

1

Bring to a boil

85

Pints only

Whole kernel corn

Raw pack

1

55

Pints only

Whole kernel corn

Hot pack

1

Bring to a boil

55

Pints only

Eggplant

Hot  pack

1

5

30

40

Mushrooms

Hot pack

½

Boil 5 minutes

45

Okra

Hot pack

½

1

25

40

Parsnips

Hot pack

1

3

30

35

Peas

Raw pack

1

40

40

Peas

Hot pack

1

Bring to a boil

40

40

Peppers

Hot pack

1

3

35

Pints only

Whole potatoes

Hot pack

½

10

35

40

Cubed potatoes

Hot pack

½

2

35

40

Soybeans

Hot pack

1

Bring to a boil

55

65

Spinach and other greens

Hot pack

½

Steam 10 minutes

70

90

Summer squash (such as
zucchini)

Hot pack

½

Bring to a boil

30

40

Sweet potatoes

Dry pack

1

20-30

65

90

Sweet potatoes

Hot pack

1

20

65

90


Boiling Water Processing Vegetables

Even if you don’t have a pressure canner, you can make your own pickles and canned tomatoes by processing in boiling water. Use the same instructions as for pressure canning, using sanitized jars and lids, except in a boiling water bath with water that covers the lid by at least 2 inches. Follow the recommendations in the table below to guarantee safe and delicious tomato products!

Timetable for Boiling Water Processing Tomatoes

Produce

Pack

Pint Processing Time

Quart Processing Time

Headroom(in inches)

Tomato juice

Hot

35

40

½

Tomato juice and flesh

Hot

35

40

½

 

Crushed tomatoes

Hot

35

45

½

Tomato sauce

Hot

35

40

¼

Whole or halved tomatoes in
juice

Raw or hot

85

85

½

Whole or halved tomatoes,
no liquid

Raw

85

85

½

 


Recipes

The following recipes include the most popular vegetable dishes for canning. Feel free to adjust spices and flavors (but not acidity or processing times) to taste. Enjoy your vegetable canning adventures!

Basic Canned Tomatoes

Ingredients

  • 8 quarts peeled and chopped tomatoes
  • ½ cup lemon juice
  •  1 tablespoon salt

Directions

Gently toss tomatoes with lemon juice and salt, then fill jars to 1/4-inch of tops.
Run a slim, non-metal tool down along the insides of jars to release any air bubbles.
Add additional paste, if necessary, to within 1/4-inch of tops.
Wipe tops and threads of jars with damp clean cloth.
Put on lids and screw bands as manufacturer directs.
Process in a boiling water bath for 45 minutes.

Variations
Cook tomatoes over medium-low heat until completely broken down to make tomato sauce, then can as for Basic Canned Tomatoes. Up to 25% of the contents of the sauce may contain herbs or other cooked vegetables, such as roasted peppers, sautéed minced onions, or garlic.
To make a tomato paste, cook tomatoes over medium-low heat until broken down and the volume is reduced by half. Strain through cheesecloth, then can as for Basic Canned Tomatoes.

Classic Dill Pickles

Ingredients

  • 25 pickling cucumbers, 2-3 inches long
  • 4 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons celery or fennel seeds
  • 4 sprigs fresh dill
  • 1 cup pickling salt, dissolved in 8 cups water

Directions
Wash cucumbers thoroughly. Soak 24 hours in brine. Drain and pat dry.
Bring vinegar, sugar, and spices to a boil.
Add cucumbers and cook 5 minutes over medium heat.
Pack cucumbers and spices in hot, sterilized jars.
Cover with cooking liquid and seal. Wait a month before opening. Makes 8 cups.


Dilly Beans

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds high quality whole green beans
  • 2 teaspoons crushed dried hot red pepper
  • 4 teaspoons dried dill seed
  • 7 cloves of peeled fresh garlic
  • 5 cups vinegar
  • 5 cups water
  • ½ cup picking salt

Directions
Wash beans thoroughly, remove stems and tips, and cut them as uniformly as possible to allow them to stand upright in pint canning jars, coming to the shoulder of the jar.
Have jars clean and very hot, and lids and sealers ready in scalding water.
In each jar, place ½ tsp of dill seed, one garlic clove, and ¼ tsp of crushed hot red pepper. Pack beans upright in jars, leaving one inch of headroom.
Heat the water, vinegar, and salt together. When the mixture boils, pour it over the beans, filling each jar to ½ inch from the top.
Run a knife down and around to remove trapped air, adjust lids, and process in a 185°F bath for ten minutes after the water in the canner returns to simmer. Remove jars and complete seals if necessary.
Makes 7 pints.

Note: if you substitute ground cayenne pepper for the crushed hot red pepper, use only 1/8 tsp per jar (or prepare for a fiery treat!) Wait at least two weeks to allow the beans to develop their full flavor.


Peter’s Pickled Peppers

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds hot peppers (such as serrano, habanero, jalapeno, or a blend) cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 6 cups vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, diced

Directions
Combine the hot peppers in a large pot. Add the vinegar, water, garlic, and onion.
Bring mixture to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 5 minutes.
Ladle cooked peppers into sterile jars and fill to the top with the remaining liquid, leaving ¼ inch headspace, and lid.
Process in a water bath for 10 to 15 minutes.
Refrigerate jars after opening.


Watermelon Pickles
Choose thick sections of rind for this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 8 cups watermelon rind
  • ½ cup pickling salt
  • 4 cups cold water
  • 1 ½ tablespoons whole cloves
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 2 cups water

Directions
Peel off the skin and trim off any remains of pink flesh. Cut into one inch cubes. Dissolve salt in cold water and pour it over rind cubes to cover (add more water if needed). Let stand 5 to 6 hours. Drain and rinse well.
Cover the rind cubes with fresh water and cook until barely tender, no more than ten minutes, erring on the side of crispness, then drain.
Combine sugar, vinegar, and water; add cloves tied in a cloth bag; bring mixture to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer for five minutes. Pour over rind cubes and let stand overnight. In the morning, bring to boiling and cook until rind is translucent but not at all mushy, about ten minutes.
Remove spice bag and pack cubes in hot, sterilized pint jars. Add boiling syrup, leaving ½ inch of headroom; adjust lids. Process in a 185° F water bath for ten minutes. Remove jars and complete seals if necessary. Makes 4 pints.


Antipasto

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cauliflower chunks
  • 1 cup broccoli chunks
  • 2 zucchini, cut in sticks
  • 2 carrots, cut in sticks
  • 2 celery sticks, roughly sliced
  • 2 medium onions, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup pickling salt
  • 8 cups water
  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 2 hot peppers (such as banana peppers), chopped
  • 2 teaspoons mustard seeds

Directions
In a large bowl, arrange vegetables in layers, sprinkling salt between each layer.
Add 6 cups of water. Cover bowl with plastic film and place a weight on top to prevent the vegetables from floating. Keep the bowl in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, drain and rinse under cold water for 2 minutes and drain again.
Combine 2 cups water with vinegar and sugar.
Dissolve sugar over low heat.
Divide garlic, hot peppers, and mustard seeds among the jars. Pack with vegetables.
Cover with sugared vinegar, leaving 1 ¼ inches head space. Seal and process 20 minutes in boiling water or 5 minutes in a pressure cooker.
Wait three weeks before tasting. Makes 10 cups.

 

Great Non-BBQ Dishes that go Great with Barbecue

Lamb-Kebabs-with-Greek-SaladEveryone likes an all-meat feast from time to time, but a true barbecue experience entails much more. After all, what would a barbecue be without potato salad or a special side dish to balance out the salty flavor? Juicy steaks are great but other non-BBQ dishes are just as essential for creating a comprehensive experience for all of your guests. And since there are more people with dietary concerns or special requirements than ever, non-BBQ dishes provide a perfect opportunity to satisfy vegetarians or picky eaters. They turn a one dimensional barbecue meal into a comprehensive dining experience in the great outdoors. Expanding your routine also allows you to exercise your culinary muscles while showing off exactly what you can do. Here is a selection of delicious non-BBQ foods that you might want to incorporate into your next barbecue party.

Lasagna – it’s no wonder why Garfield loves this dish so much. It goes great on its own, but it also complements barbecue meals perfectly. Loaded with cheese and just the right amount of pasta in between, you get a dish that goes well with anything from steak to chicken. You can go to any Italian restaurant and chances are they have lasagna and BBQ chicken as an option, so why not put it together in your own backyard? It’s also incredibly easy to make and you can prepare it well before you light up your grill.

Fresh Baked Bread – you don’t necessarily have to bake the bread yourself since any local bakery can handle the job nicely. Just make sure that you get it as fresh as possible, and it’s not necessary to settle for one kind either. There are wonderful breads that go well with barbecue meals ranging from cornbread to sourdough. And don’t discount traditional fresh baked bread either because there’s nothing wrong with going back to basics.

Greek Salad – some salads always make an appearance at your barbecue dinner table and these include potato salad, garden salad, or even coleslaw. Why not add a bit of delicious feta cheese into the mix with a traditional Greek salad? This type of salad is extremely easy to prepare and it’s loaded with healthy goodies and abundant flavor. Best of all, you don’t have to be an expert chef to chop up your selection of vegetables and put them into a single bowl. Of course the main attraction is the Feta cheese so make sure you get it nice and fresh.

Rice Pilaf – Rice pilaf helps to balance out salty flavors and cleanse the palate a little bit. You can even make it a bit on the bland side on purpose if you’re serving heavier meats loaded with barbecue sauce. The combination of vegetables and firm rice provides a distinct type of texture that goes well with your barbecue meal.

Curry – if you want to add a bit of multicultural flair to your barbecue meal, then you can always explore the world of curry. It’s extremely easy to prepare and makes use of meat and vegetable in incredible ways. Curry also tastes great over white rice or you can add a whole new dynamic by using traditional Jasmine Rice. You can even go with and all-vegetable curry to offer your vegetarian guests a great dish. Or you can go with a chicken or beef curry which will be just as popular as anything that comes off your grill.

In the end, the possibilities are truly endless and you should always be looking to revitalize your barbecue routine. Never let things get stale because a predictable menu is something you want to avoid. Go ahead and try new things because even if they don’t turn out to be popular favorites, you always have your barbecue food as backup. And when things go well, people will simply marvel at your creativity and imagination while acknowledging you are the perfect barbecue host.

These meal ideas come to us from gasgrillsandbbq.com where barbecue comes before anything else. You can check them out if you need to upgrade your traditional charcoal grill with a wide selection of modern gas grills that will blow you away.

The Meaty Pantry: Everything You Need to Know About Canning Meats

All-American-Pressure-Canner-21-qtAlthough most people hear the word “canning” and think “jams and pickles,” the art of home canning extends to all sorts of foodstuffs, including a wide variety of meat and seafood. So if you’re short on freezer space and don’t care for jerky, never fear: canning help is here!

The most popular meats for canning include beef, lamb, pork, and chicken. They aren’t the only meats you may can, though—domestic rabbits and small game also can well, and use the same simple method as chicken and other poultry.

The largest challenge in canning meat lies in the fact that meat is one of the best breeding grounds for bacteria. It’s essential to use high-quality, fresh meat and to handle it quickly and in extremely clean conditions. In addition, you should only can meat that comes from a known source—and that doesn’t mean knowing the name of your grocery store manager! It is essential to know that the source of your meat was raised in healthy conditions and that the meat was handled properly and with the highest regard to sanitation. In most cases, this means growing and slaughtering your own domestic animals, or purchasing meat from a farmer who you know and trust and whose operation you are familiar with.

If you are canning wild game, only use meat from a freshly killed animal that appeared perfectly healthy.

The Importance of Pressure Canning Meat and Seafood

All meat and seafood absolutely must be pressure canned, rather than processed in a boiling water bath. Because it takes only one spoonful from one jar of poisoned food to cause serious illness or death, the pressure canner may be the most important investment you make.

All pressure canners work according to the same principle. The pan has a tight sealing lid with a regulator. When a small amount of water (usually 1 to 3 inches) is heated in the canner, it is converted to steam, which builds up pressure and reaches temperatures substantially higher than boiling. At 10 to 15 pounds of pressure, the temperature is 240° to 250° F. Safety features maintain pressure at reasonable levels and auto-release if the pressure becomes too high.

Pressure Canning Step by Step:

  1. After packing Mason jars and fitting them with lids and screwbands, put the rack in the canner and add 2 to 3 inches of water. Then place jars on the rack. If you like, you may fill the rack before placing it in the canner. Put the lid on the canner and fasten it securely.
  2. Open the petcock or remove the weight. Heat on high until steam flows out.
  3. Continue to heat on high for 10 minutes before closing the petcock or placing the weight on the vent port. During the next 3 to 5 minutes, the pressure will build.
  4. When the dial gauge shows the recommended amount of pressure, or when the petcock begins jiggling or rocking, set the timer for the time specified in your recipe. At high altitudes, increase the pressure ½ pound for each 1,000 feet above sea level.
  5. Maintain a temperature at or just above the specified gauge pressure. Weighted gauges will jiggle 2 or 3 times per minute or rock slowly, depending on the brand. Avoid large variations in temperature, which may cause liquid to be forced from jars,
    jeopardizing the seal.
  6. When the time is up, turn off the heat, remove canner from burner if possible, and let it depressurize. Do not use cold water to speed depressurization and avoid opening the vent port. Let the canner sit 30 minutes if loaded with pints, or 45 minutes with quarts. Some models cool more quickly and have vent locks that indicate when pressure is normal.
  7.  When pressure has returned to normal, remove the weight or open the petcock. Let canner sit for two minutes before unfastening and removing the lid. Keep your face away from the canner to avoid escaping steam.
  8. Using a jar lifter, remove the jars and place them on a folded towel, allowing at least 1 inch of air to circulate between them.

The Importance of Cooking Meat and Seafood

Canned meat should also always be cooked. Although it has been a popular American practice in recent history to preserve meat by raw canning, it is not possible to guarantee the safety of meats packed raw.

It is always a better choice to freeze, rather than can, raw or undercooked meat. It is absolutely necessary to use a pressure canner when canning any kind of meat.

Process your cans at 10 pounds per square inch at sea level or 15 pounds per square inch at altitude. This process will destroy any and all bacteria and ensure that your meat is safe to eat. To keep your meat from spending too much time in warm air, work with a small amount at a time while storing the rest in the refrigerator.

As with any canned food, inspect your cans for signs of spoilage before you enjoy the contents.

Signs for Spoilage of Meat Products Include:

  • A broken seal
  • An “off” odor
  • Seepage around the seal
  • Small bubbles in the food
  • A spurt of liquid when you open the container
  • Yeasty or cloudy liquid
  • Mold (even the tiniest amount!)

 Tips For Canning Red Meats

Prime cuts of beef, lamb, pork, veal, and large game should be canned in the largest pieces you can fit in your containers. To can these large pieces, follow these steps:

  • Wipe the pieces of raw meat with a clean, damp cloth. Remove any bones or fat that is visible on the surface of the meat.
  • Place the pieces in a large, shallow pan with ½ cup of water.
  • Cook over medium heat, turning often, until pieces are cooked medium well.
  • Pack meat in straight-sided jars. Add boiling liquid (meat stock or vegetable stock are good choices) until jar is full, leaving an inch of headroom.
  • Process at 10 pounds per square inch at 240° F. Pints should be processed for 75 minutes and quarts for 90 minutes.

Most organ meats do not can well, with the exception of tongue. To can tongue, soak the meat in cold water for 4-6 hours, scrubbing the tongue and changing the water every two hours. Boil the tongues in a large pot. Skim off the foam that initially rises to the top, then lightly salt the water and continue to cook until the tongue is done medium well. Remove from water, rinse with cool water, then remove and skin or other inedible parts. Pack as for other pieces of meat.

Tips For Canning Poultry

Poultry is canned slightly differently from the red meats listed above. The process for canning poultry includes chicken, turkey, goose, and duck, as well as domestic rabbits, wild birds, and other small game. Unlike with red meat, you may leave the skin on. Pack raw pieces into a large pan, cover with chicken or vegetable stock, and bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook until meat is medium-well done. Pack meat with broth as for red meat, above.

You may also can the giblets of your poultry. If you have enough liver to process and pack separately from your other giblets, do so. Use canned giblets in meat sauces, gravies, or meat pies. To pack gizzards and hearts, clean and trim off any gristle or fat. Cut gizzards and large hearts in half. Boil in broth until done medium well. To pack livers, first remove any fat and cut away the gall sac and any connecting tissue between the lobes. Cook over medium heat in broth until done medium well—they will cook much more quickly than other giblets, so watch them closely.

Tips For Canning Seafood

It is also possible to can many kinds of seafood. Most fish and shellfish have very low acidity, which means it is essential to only can them with a properly used pressure canner, just as with other types of meat. Freshness is also of the essence when canning seafood, as even a couple hours at room temperature will turn fish unfit to can.

Salmon, lake trout, whitefish, mackerel, mullet, and shad can both be raw-packed, although they should be brined prior to canning. To make a brine, dissolve ¾ cup of pickling salt in a gallon of cold water. Immerse your pieces of fish in the brine, weighing them down if necessary, for one full hour. Drain the pieces but do not rinse them. Other fish and shellfish (aside from clams) should be precooked to medium well before being packed. ½ pint jars should be processed at 10 pounds and 240°F for 70 minutes.

Clams are a special case. Clams should be purchased (or dug) fresh and alive. Once brought home, hold your clams in clean, cool saltwater (not sea water!) made from ¼ cup pickling salt to 1 gallon of water for 24 hours, then steamed open, removed from their shells, and acid blanched in a boiling solution of 2 teaspoons of citric acid powder dissolved in a gallon of water for 2 minutes. Pack and process steamed and acid blanched clams in ½ pint jars at 10 pounds and 240°F for 60 minutes.

A Final Note

When proper procedure and safety precautions are followed, canning meats is an efficient, productive, and delicious way to store food for the future. So be safe, follow directions, and above all, enjoy your adventures in canning!

Read our detailed review on the All American Pressure Canner Cooker. We consider it to be the best on the market and it is manufactured in the US.

Save Money by Sticking to Kitchen Basics

All Clad Stainless Starter Cookware SetYou have probably seen more than your fair share of kitchen gadgets heralded in print, commercial and in-store display advertisements. They are marketed to save you time and effort, but make no mistake — their main focus is to get you to spend money. While some cooks undoubtedly benefit from the occasional gadget, most kitchens need only a few basic instruments to produce a variety of delicious meals. Some gadgets will save you time in the kitchen while others merely take up counter or cabinet space. Investing in the bare necessities allows you to make a realistic assessment of which extras would benefit your kitchen workspace.

Pots and Pans

You may be surprised at how few pots and pans are necessary. Many manufacturers bundle several sizes into a single package, but Real Simple Magazine suggests that you can get away with just a stockpot, sauté pan, and saucepan. Make sure that your pots and pans each have a lid, so you can use them for various cooking applications. Selecting heavy-duty materials, such as stainless steel and cast iron allow you to start a meal on the stove and finish it in the oven without dirtying another dish. A 9×13 pan is suitable for baked goods, casseroles and more.

Utilitarian Utensils

One good knife is all you really need. While several specialty knives exist, a high-quality chef’s knife or santoku will easily handle all of your chopping, peeling, slicing and dicing. To properly care for your knife, you should have a steel in your kitchen inventory. This video illustrates how honing a blade with a steel improves blade performance. A cutting board is also a necessity, to save countertops from damage.

Other extremely versatile kitchen utensils include tongs, wooden spoons and whisks. Spatula is a word that describes several types of cooking and baking instruments, two of which should be represented in a basic kitchen. A rubber spatula is useful for scraping down the sides of a bowl or jar. A turner is a spatula that literally turns food over in the pan. It is used for pancakes, hamburgers and more.

Great Gadgetry

People use several gadgets much more frequently than other tools. For instance, families that eat plenty of pasta may wish to find a suitable colander for straining boiling water from prepared noodles. If your family prefers to eat Asian food, a rice cooker may be invaluable. Vegetable peelers, box graters, can openers and food processors are among the most popular kitchen gadgets. Though a knife can do each of these jobs, they make the process much quicker. If you plan to use recipes in the kitchen, you will have to use instruments for precise portioning such as measuring spoons and measuring cups. Electric mixers, pastry brushes and rolling pins are very popular among people who bake.

Billeater offers tips and advice to anyone looking to save money on bills, cost of living, and small business expenses.